PortBUG: Hart Street Redevelopment Starting Monday…


Section including Carlisle St intersection & western ramp of the Jervois Bridge.

The PortBUG has been informed that work will begin tomorrow – Monday August 6th – on road works for the redevelopment of Hart Street, Semaphore. We thought it might be worth posting yet again about this important project – this time in a bit more detail!

The Hart Street Project is part of DPTI’s ‘Streets for People’ program, based on principles drawn from the ‘Streets for People: Compendium for South Australian Practice’. The Project is illustrated in some detail in the 3 plans and the cross-sections below. Readers will note that for bicycle users in particular there are some interesting innovations:

  • at the uncontrolled intersection at Carlisle Street
  • at the light-controlled intersection at Swan Terrace
  • on the western approach to the Jervois Bridge
  • at the entrances to the various side streets.

Here is the cross-section at the blue ‘C’ line in the above plan.

 

The current 4 vehicle lanes will be reduced to 2 and the speed limit lowered to 50km/h. Much brighter and effective new LED lighting has already been installed.

Originally it was intended that there be a ‘Dutch-style’ roundabout at the junction of Hart & Carlisle Streets, This was abandoned due to the expense and instead we now have the bike lanes to and from the adjacent Jervois Bridge continuing through the intersection in green-marked lanes.

This green surface marking will also be used:

  • where the northern-side bike lane crosses the continuation of Hart Street alongside the Bridge
  • at a new entrance ramp from the bike-lane up onto the northern-side Bridge Bikeway.

Hart Street: Mid-section – Le Fevre H.S, Swan Terrace & Netball Courts.

Here is the cross-section at the orange ‘B’ line above. The bus stops are immediately outside Le Fevre H.S.

For the first time bicycle users will have access to bike lanes on both sides – a regular full-time painted lane on the northern side and a protected bike lane on the southern side. It looks like considerable effort has been made to ensure effective separation where possible, particularly at the more predictable risk points at intersections and side roads.

It appears that six new pedestrian crossings have also been provided (in addition to existing crossings adjacent to the High School, the Military Rd roundabout and the Swan Trc lights). Along with the new and much improved lighting, the reduced speed limit and the reduction of traffic lanes – these new crossings should greatly enhance safety for pedestrians and the many children and adults involved in sporting activities nearby.

Cross-section at the ‘A’ line above. This is just west of the existing light-controlled school crossing adjacent to the High School.

Some questions remain as to sight-lines for car drivers emerging from side streets and at the intersections – we’ll try to discuss these with the Project Team asap. As far as the PortBUG is aware this will be the first time a major metro-area arterial road will receive such intensive ‘treatment’ in the interests of all road users! That is, acknowledging its use by pedestrians and bicycle, wheel-chair & mobility-device users as well as motor vehicle drivers!

The PortBUG suggests that Hart Street may well become a ‘model’ for how other challenging ‘mixed-traffic’ thoroughfares might be dealt with across the metro area! Examples might include North Terrace and Hutt Street in the CBD, Prospect and Woodville Roads, and St Vincent Street and Commercial Road in Port Adelaide.

 

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